Pink Roses Simple Bouquet

Simple rose bouquets nicely brighten up any room. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Simple rose bouquets nicely brighten up any room. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Pink Roses Simple Bouquet

Another home decorating magazine at a local business office was extolling the virtues of huge flower bouquets to decorate rooms, including dining room tables. The challenge with making huge, tall bouquets is that once people are seated across from each other, they can’t see because the flower bouquets are in the way.

Over the years, I have developed a preference for smaller, simpler bouquets and you can’t get much more basic than one or two roses in a vase like this pink roses simple bouquet now in my den.

To help simple bouquets last longer, cut roses at different stages of opening. I try to have one fully open rose and then several rose buds so they can extend the life of the little bouquet as the rose buds unfold.

Rose buds unfolding, left, are the best ones to cut for bouquets. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Rose buds unfolding, left, are the best ones to cut for bouquets. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

To ensure you extend the flowering bouquet, pick roses in bud form and ready to start unfurling.

The rose bud on the right in the photo may be a little too early to cut for a bouquet. It may open if cut but I would tend to wait another day or two before bringing it inside.

The rose bud on the left, however, is at just the right stage to be cut and added to a flower bouquet.

Cutting rose in bud form helps them last longer in a vase. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Cutting rose in bud form helps them last longer in a vase. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

This pink rose starting to open was picked at the budding stage in the earlier photo and, after two days in a vase, is starting to open.

Remember to cut roses early morning when it’s still cool; take a jar with water with you so once the roses are cut you can place them immediately into water. The less stress for the flowers the longer they will last.

And yes, this rose bud has a bite out of one of its petals. If you don’t like seeing the missing piece, you can gently remove the petal by pulling on it, which is what florists do to clean up a wilting rose.

I myself like to see the hole, it reminds me that some bug was partaking of the edible flower. Every flower, just like handmade quilts, has a story. Part of enjoying this simple pink rose bouquet is imagining a story for these flowers.

What would your story be?

Charlotte

June Wildflowers Bouquet

These are Missouri wildflowers cut from starts I am planting. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

These are Missouri wildflowers cut from starts I am planting. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

June Wildflowers Bouquet

In addition to adding a touch of nature and beauty to a room. I am going to add “relaxing” to the reasons why you should have a bouquet of flowers in your most-used room.

This is a bouquet of Missouri native wildflowers from a pile of plants someone tossed. The wildflowers were broken at the top of the plants so I cut them off and placed them in a jar of water before trimming the rest of the plants so I could more easily plant them in my garden.

By cutting off the flowering sections, the plants will concentrate their energy on establishing their roots in their new homes and may bloom again later in the growing season.

In the bouquet, there is a mixture of hardy perennials that will start blooming this month and continue until fall. How do I know?

In addition to having some of these already growing in my garden, I easily keep track of what is blooming in nature through Missouri Department of Conservation’s Natural Events calendar. These calendars are usually available October through the beginning of the new year.

Missouri Department of Conservation’s Natural Events calendar lists what wildflowers are in bloom. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Missouri Department of Conservation’s Natural Events calendar lists what wildflowers are in bloom. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

This wonderful annual calendar also has a natural event on every day of the week including when hummingbirds migrate and when honey bees swarm. This year, the honey bee swarm season began May 9, 2019.

These calendars are now staples in the beginning beekeeping classes I teach through Rolla Bee Club. It is helpful as a beekeeper to know what is blooming because that is the source of nectar and pollen for insects.

Now that you see the list of Missouri wildflowers in bloom, can you identify some of them in this flower bouquet?

Can you identify some of the Missouri wildflowers? (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Can you identify some of the Missouri wildflowers? (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Here is a hint, purple coneflowers are among these bouquet flowers.

And yes, I find it very relaxing to sit in my den sofa and look at the bouquet of flowers. Some of them are still opening up so it’s interesting to see the flower bouquet evolve as the flowers bloom.

Charlotte

A Small Garden Flower Bouquet

Uh-oh, is there a rabbit after this beautiful little bouquet of red hybrid tea roses? (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Uh-oh, is there a rabbit after this beautiful little bouquet of red hybrid tea roses? (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

A Garden Flower Bouquet

Of all of the things we can do to decorate our homes, adding a small bouquet of fresh flowers out of our gardens is the simplest, and most enjoyable, thing we can do. Not only does it bring some beauty into the room but you can add whimsy by pairing the flowers with a favorite decorating item.

In my case, the white porcelain rabbit has been a favorite coffee table partner for many years. I confess I make bouquets in relationship to the porcelain piece, such as this little bouquet of red hybrid tea roses I snipped from one of my rose beds.

I have real rabbits in my garden as well so having the little porcelain one inside reminds me of the ones living happily outside. Many are native wild rabbits, released into my garden when I was a rehabilitator for our local conservation office.

To easily add a small garden bouquet to your room decor, cut the flowers early morning and keep them in a vase of water not treated with salt for water softeners. That salt quickly cuts down the time the cut flowers will remain fresh in the vase.

Once you have the vase you want to use, re-cut the stems to the appropriate length. Add a pinch of aspirin to help keep the flowers fresh, then position them where you can enjoy them. Don't place them on top of electrical appliances such as TVs or anything else that produces heat. The heat will cut down the lifespan of the flowers.

Hardly. There is a rabbit but its porcelain and still has the good taste to admire the flowers. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

Hardly. There is a rabbit but its porcelain and still has the good taste to admire the flowers. (Photo by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins)

These small red hybrid tea roses are sitting on my den coffee table so I can enjoy them when I am working.

I could have cut them with longer stems but I chose to keep them small. The smaller bouquets are easier to incorporate into a room close to where everyone can enjoy them.

Charlotte

Surprise Lilies

Surprise lilies in a flower vase in Bluebird Gardens kitchen.

Surprise lilies in a flower vase in Bluebird Gardens kitchen.

Surprise Lilies

One of the nicest garden gifts you can give is a bouquet of surprise lilies, even if it's just to yourself to brighten up a corner of your house.

Surprise lilies are hardy perennial bulbs that bloom usually in August in USDA zone 5b on leafless long green stems. Their aromatic pink flowers fade to a soft lavender as they age, the buds good to cut as they have first started to bloom.

Over the years, I have given away dozens of bouquets of surprise lilies, placing the pink flowers in tall vases and taking advantage of the dramatic look of the flowers on their long green stems. Some of the surprise lily bouquets have been used on altars in weddings.

Surprise lilies popping up in Bluebird Gardens.

Surprise lilies popping up in Bluebird Gardens.

Let's face it, though, not everyone has the room for a bouquet of tall surprise lilies so don't let those long legs discourage you.

Try surprise lilies cut short in a smaller vase, as I have in my kitchen. You can still enjoy the aroma and beauty of the flowers without having to struggle to peer around the vase!

Charlotte

Gooseneck Loosestrife Bouquet

Gooseneck loosestrife with miniature roses bouquet.

Gooseneck Loosestrife Bouquet

One of my favorite flowers has a funny name and can be invasive but I would still say find a spot in your garden for gooseneck loosestrife.

This perennial produces lovely tiny white flowers in clusters that resemble a goose neck. The flowers last a long time as cut flowers, and are a favorite of butterflies and a variety of bees.

Relatively easy to grow where I live, USDA zone 5b, gooseneck loosestrife will grow in shade. It can also grow in sunshine but if it has a preference of where to invade, it will choose a shady spot.

I would give this plant its own corner of the flower garden, allowing it to grow until you have a nice little bed you can cut from and enjoy in vases inside. The flowers are pretty all by themselves or mixed in with other flowers blooming at the same time.

If gooseneck loosestrife starts to move into areas you don't want it, just pull out of the ground. The plant grows with shallow roots and can be easily removed by hand.

Charlotte

Twig Reindeer Contact Information

Glad you enjoyed my earlier story on seeing twig reindeer traveling through town. There are few things that will put one in a holiday spirit than seeing Santa's transportation driving close by. 

Aren't they fun? Can you see one of these in your garden??

In answer to several requests, here's the contact information for the guy who handmakes these twig reindeer:

 Please share your photos of your reindeer when you get one, would love to see them in your garden!

Charlotte

 

Dry Hydrangeas for Custom Decor

If you like to make dried flower wreaths and dried flower gift tags, hydrangeas are easy to dry and long lasting.

Cut off flower heads past their prime and hang from string tied to a rod in a cool dark place. We have them hanging from a rod hanging over the sink in a dark garage corner.

You can use hydrangeas as they are, which is what I do. You can also spray paint them to add color to a wreath. The dried flowers nicely hold color without drying out.

Great excuse to add more hydrangeas in your garden landscape!

Charlotte


Think Fresh Flowers as Cake Topper!

Fresh flowers are not just for flower vases any more.


I've been known to tuck flowers in all sorts of things - as decorations for gifts, inside a get well card, once in a book as a page marker.

Decorating cakes with flowers out of icing can be fun, but who wants to eat all of that sugar icing - or even cut into the flowers?? At a recent farewell potluck lunch, I was delighted to see the cake decorated with a stunning bouquet of fresh garden flowers, all held in the cake by a small glass flower vase.

Best of all, after the cake is gone, they will still have flowers to enjoy!

Charlotte

Use Favorite Birdhouses as Table Decoration

This little birdhouse was a gift so it had special memories.

Last year part of the roof rotted, so I removed the piece, sanded down the edges and treated the cleaned birdhouse with a couple coats of polyurethane. I then found an old glass bottle that would fit through the opening.

Filled with flowers, the renovated birdhouse works well as an outdoor table decoration under a deck umbrella, or anywhere inside the house where you want some whimsy.

Charlotte

Pick the Right Flower Vase

Giving someone a bouquet of spring flowers out of your garden is a great gift for any occasion. Choosing the right vase makes all the difference in how flowers look, and how long they will last after being picked. I prefer to use flower containers that are rounded at the bottom. The rounded bottom gives cut flowers access to more water, and they won't be quickly traumatized by going dry overnight. So many cut flowers don't last long because they've run out of water!

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Welcome

Welcome to Made Just For You.

I started Bluebird Gardens in 1998 on the premise that everyone can make
something; they just don’t always think of it as being special.
In my world, it is the thought that counts.
I’ll let you in on a little secret; making something for someone is
sometimes more fun than giving it away.
I’ll be featuring those wonderful homemade handmade things,
and the people who are special enough to get them.

What are you making?

Charlotte

Spring Flowers Make Great Cut Flowers

Welcome spring by giving someone a bouquet of daffodils straight out of your garden.

One of my favorite spring flowers are early daffodils. They are small; they need flower vases that are no more than 6" tall and look good tucked into any nearby corner.

Mid-flowering and late flowering daffodils and tulips will easily fit into standard, taller vases. You can also cut them to fit smaller containers.

Anemones, snow drops, glories of the snow and other small spring flowers will best fit in 2-4" containers.

If you plan to mix daffodils with other spring flowers, let them sit bythemselves in water for a few hours before mixing them. Daffodils have a toxin that will kill other flowers if you mix them immediately. I leave cut daffodils sitting in a vase by themselves overnight, then mix the flowers in the same vase in the morning.

There's nothing like a bouquet of home grown flowers to brighten someone's day, including mine!

Charlotte